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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Great war camps on Cannock Chase found in the catalog.

Great war camps on Cannock Chase

C. J. Whitehouse

Great war camps on Cannock Chase

by C. J. Whitehouse

  • 170 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by C J Whitehouse, G P Ibbotson in Brocton .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby C.J. Whitehouse and G.P. Ibbotson.
ContributionsIbbotson, G P.
The Physical Object
Pagination22, (6) leaves, 11 leaves of plates :
Number of Pages22
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13753939M

Army training camps on Cannock Chase during the Great War. In Lord Lichfield had given permission for two large training and transit camps to be constructed on Cannock Chase. The camps at Rugeley and Brocton were able to accommodate aro men and it is estimated that around half a million soldiers passed through the camps during File Size: 1MB. In the autumn of , construction of two large camps, known as Brocton Camp and Rugeley Camp, began on Cannock Chase. Over , British and Dominion troops were trained for service in the war at two huge camps on Cannock Chase, the archaeological remains of which are still there as part of .

  During World War One thousands of soldiers of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade (NZRB) arrived for training at Brocton Military Camp on Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. They even had their own mascot, Freda the dog who they found at the front and brought back. Freda’s grave remains on Cannock Chase. The Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery (grid reference SJ) is on Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, England. The cemetery contains nearly 5, burials from both the First and Second World War. The burials are mainly German and Austrian nationals with a very small number of Ukrainians. 2 Layout of the Cemetery. 3 Notable ed by: Diez Brandi, Göttingen, Germany, Harold .

Heritage and History on Cannock Chase. Heritage and History on Cannock Chase is everywhere. From the Iron Age to present day, there is plenty to see and do. Take a look at the scheduled ancient monuments at Shugborough Hall and ramble around the ancient parkland. Be wary of the areas of active mining, quarrying and forestry that still takes. He first became aware of the existence of the camp while walking over Cannock Chase in Staffordshire, finding sewer covers in what appeared to be uninhabited heathland. Intrigued, the author set out to investigate the mystery and discovered that the sewers were for two Army camps – Brocton and Rugeley – that had been constructed for soldiers training during the First World War.


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Great war camps on Cannock Chase by C. J. Whitehouse Download PDF EPUB FB2

Richard Pursehouse has pieced together their story from old letters written by a clerk who worked at the camp in the First World War. The book, called Prisoners on Cannock Chase Author: Jamie Brassington. There is much more to the story of the Camps on Cannock Chase than can be included here, particularly local memories.

A comprehensive history of the Camps can be found in C.J. and G.P. Whitehouse’s. Buy Great War Camps On Cannock Chase - A Town For Four Winters. Reprint by Whitehouse, C.J.

and G.P. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on /5(8). The great war Training camps built at Brocton and Rugeley. The German Military Cemetery built [sic?] The Cannock Chase Military Pensions Hospital at Brindley Heath was situated yards from the Pye Green Tower and was closed on March 1st Originally the war office had leased the land in for the sum of £48 November of Great War Camps On Cannock Chase - A Town For Four Winters.

by Whitehouse, C.J. And G.P. at - ISBN - ISBN - C. And G. Whitehouse - - Price Range: £ - £ Buy Prisoners on Cannock Chase: Great War PoWs and Brocton Camp by Richard Pursehouse (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low 5/5(5). The Story of WWI on Cannock Chase project, the Friends of Cannock Chase are running a series of free workshops.

Credit: Friends of Cannock Chase Together the two camps were capable of holding up to. The Great War Hut A piece of preserved history This hut originated from one of the two military camps built on Cannock Chase during the Great War; Brocton Camp and Rugeley Camp.

User contributed article about, Photographs of the Rugeley and Brocton Training Camps and their associated infrastructure dating from the Great War Geograph - photograph every grid square Legacy of the Great War on Cannock Chase.

Brocton Camp 'J-Lines' Centenary Apple Tree on Tar Hill. There are a number of apple and pear trees scattered through the Great War camps on Cannock Chase which fruit in the autumn.

It may be assumed that these originated from pips discarded by soldiers and would have germinated in the disturbed ground when the camps were dismantled after the ers: At the outbreak of the Great War insufficient barrack accommodation existed for the overwhelming numbers of men enlisting.

By December with over one million recruits new hutted camps were required. Lord Lichfield offered free use of part of his property on Cannock Chase. Of course, the CWGC cemetery which was started near to the camp hospital is still there.

There's a very good little book about the camps (there were two, Brocton Camp and Rugeley Camp) called "A Town for Four Winters" by C. and G. Whitehouse.

It has plans of the camp and several "then and now" photographs. The First World War camps are only one part of the story of Cannock Chase. There is a long history of coal mining, ironworking and glass making and we looked at the remains of these industries.

Early coal mining involved digging small pits or shafts and groups of coal pits still survive across parts of the Chase.

Introduction In the autumn ofonly months after the start of the First World War, construction of two large camps began on Cannock Chase. The camps (known as Brocton Camp and Rugeley Camp) were constructed with the permission of Lord Lichfield, on whose estate they were being built. The infrastructure for the camps.

Great War Camps On Cannock Chase - A Town For Four Winters C.J. and G.P. Whitehouse An original study of military camps on Cannock Chase during the Great War, He first became aware of the existence of the camp while walking over Cannock Chase in Staffordshire, finding sewer covers in what appeared to be uninhabited heathland.

Intrigued, the author set out to investigate the mystery and discovered that the sewers were for two Army camps – Brocton and Rugeley – that had been constructed for soldiers training during the First World : £ Great War Camps on Cannock Chase by C.J.

& G.P. Whitehouse. Published in by Staffordshire County Council. The Best of Cannock Chase by "Pitman". Reprinted from th e "Express & Star" in The Friendship of Cannock Chase by "Pitman". Reprinted from the "Express & Star" in Sweet Vernal. A Collection of Country Journeys by Jean.

Cannock Chase Great War Camps Interpretation Centre. The hut which was to become the Cannock Chase Great War Camps Interpretation Centre spent 85 years of its life as a parish hall in the village of Gayton, around 10 miles north of Cannock Chase.

It was used to host whist drives, dances, wedding receptions as well as local meetings. - Great War Military Camps on Cannock Chase. See more ideas about Military, Camping and War pins. Pursehouse's book, Prisoners on Cannock Chase (Frontline Books) is surely the definitive work on the subject, a gem packed with facts, photos and anecdotes about the PoW camps which, but for his.

To tell the story of Cannock Chase through time the project held a commemorative event in June Particular focus resting upon the Great War camps as a link to the Centennial commemoration.

Particular focus was on the role of the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, the battle of Messines and its connection to Cannock Chase Centenary commemoration.Plans to highlight the history of Cannock Chase including the role of the Great War training camps are being planned for the summer.

The Chase’s two military camps trained over half a million troops for the trenches from across the UK and abroad and today survive as the most complete Great War archaeological sites in the country.Location Prisoner of War Camp Cannock Chase.

First World War () Brook Ln, Brocton; Great Haywood Commonwealth War Graves St. Michael and All Angels Churchyard - Colwich German War Cemetery Cannock Chase - Cannock Chase.